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Human ISWI chromatin-remodeling complexes sample nucleosomes via transient binding reactions and become immobilized at active sites

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2010
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Title
Human ISWI chromatin-remodeling complexes sample nucleosomes via transient binding reactions and become immobilized at active sites
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2010
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1003438107
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erdel F, Schubert T, Marth C, Längst G, Rippe K

Abstract

Chromatin remodeling complexes can translocate nucleosomes along the DNA in an ATP-dependent manner. Here, we studied autofluorescent protein constructs of the human ISWI family members Snf2H, Snf2L, the catalytically inactive Snf2L+13 splice variant, and the accessory Acf1 subunit in living human and mouse cells by fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy. Except for Snf2L, which was not detected in the U2OS cell line, the endogenous ISWI proteins were abundant at nuclear concentrations between 0.14 and 0.83 μM. A protein interaction analysis showed the association of multimeric Snf2H and Acf1 into a heterotetramer or higher-order ACF complex. During the G1/2 cell cycle phase, Snf2H and Snf2L displayed average residence times <150 ms in the chromatin-bound state. The comparison of active and inactive Snf2H/Snf2L indicated that an immobilized fraction potentially involved in active chromatin remodeling comprised only 1-3%. This fraction was largely increased at replication foci in S phase or at DNA repair sites. To rationalize these findings we propose that ISWI remodelers operate via a "continuous sampling" mechanism: The propensity of nucleosomes to be translocated is continuously tested in transient binding reactions. Most of these encounters are unproductive and efficient remodeling requires an increased binding affinity to chromatin. Due to the relatively high intranuclear remodeler concentrations cellular response times for repositioning a given nucleosome were calculated to be in the range of tens of seconds to minutes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Germany 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
France 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 73 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 31 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 28%
Student > Master 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 72%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Unspecified 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2010.
All research outputs
#2,017,822
of 3,627,884 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#23,232
of 33,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,418
of 231,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#490
of 766 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,627,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 33,578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 766 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.