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Early procurement of scarlet macaws and the emergence of social complexity in Chaco Canyon, NM

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
Title
Early procurement of scarlet macaws and the emergence of social complexity in Chaco Canyon, NM
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1509825112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam S. Watson, Stephen Plog, Brendan J. Culleton, Patricia A. Gilman, Steven A. LeBlanc, Peter M. Whiteley, Santiago Claramunt, Douglas J. Kennett

Abstract

High-precision accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) (14)C dates of scarlet macaw (Ara macao) skeletal remains provide the first direct evidence from Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico that these Neotropical birds were procured from Mesoamerica by Pueblo people as early as ∼A.D. 900-975. Chaco was a prominent prehistoric Pueblo center with a dense concentration of multistoried great houses constructed from the 9th through early 12th centuries. At the best known great house of Pueblo Bonito, unusual burial crypts and significant quantities of exotic and symbolically important materials, including scarlet macaws, turquoise, marine shell, and cacao, suggest societal complexity unprecedented elsewhere in the Puebloan world. Scarlet macaws are known markers of social and political status among the Pueblos. New AMS (14)C-dated scarlet macaw remains from Pueblo Bonito demonstrate that these birds were acquired persistently from Mesoamerica between A.D. 900 and 1150. Most of the macaws date before the hypothesized apogeal Chacoan period (A.D. 1040-1110) to which they are commonly attributed. The 10th century acquisition of these birds is consistent with the hypothesis that more formalized status hierarchies developed with significant connections to Mesoamerica before the post-A.D. 1040 architectural florescence in Chaco Canyon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
France 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 50 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 35%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Master 8 15%
Other 4 7%
Professor 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 21 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 22%
Arts and Humanities 5 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2018.
All research outputs
#295,229
of 15,839,347 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6,226
of 86,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,837
of 233,948 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#115
of 945 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,839,347 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 86,028 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,948 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 945 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.