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PNAS

Metabolic theory and taxonomic identity predict nutrient recycling in a diverse food web

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
12 X users

Citations

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70 Dimensions

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204 Mendeley
Title
Metabolic theory and taxonomic identity predict nutrient recycling in a diverse food web
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1420819112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacob Edward Allgeier, Seth J. Wenger, Amy D. Rosemond, Daniel E. Schindler, Craig A. Layman

Abstract

Reconciling the degree to which ecological processes are generalizable among taxa and ecosystems, or contingent on the identity of interacting species, remains a critical challenge in ecology. Ecological stoichiometry (EST) and metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) are theoretical approaches used to evaluate how consumers mediate nutrient dynamics and energy flow through ecosystems. Recent theoretical work has explored the utility of these theories, but empirical tests in species-rich ecological communities remain scarce. Here we use an unprecedented dataset collected from fishes and dominant invertebrates (n = 900) in a diverse subtropical coastal marine community (50 families, 72 genera, 102 species; body mass range: 0.04-2,597 g) to test the utility of EST and MTE in predicting excretion rates of nitrogen (EN), phosphorus (EP), and their ratio (ENP). Body mass explained a large amount of the variation in EN and EP but not ENP. Strong evidence in support of the MTE 3/4 allometric scaling coefficient was found for EP, and for EN only after accounting for variation in excretion rates among taxa. In all cases, including taxonomy in models substantially improved model performance, highlighting the importance of species identity for this ecosystem function. Body nutrient content and trophic position explained little of the variation in EN, EP, or ENP, indicating limited applicability of basic predictors of EST. These results highlight the overriding importance of MTE for predicting nutrient flow through organisms, but emphasize that these relationships still fall short of explaining the unique effects certain species can have on ecological processes.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 204 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
Portugal 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Unknown 188 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 56 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 20%
Student > Master 31 15%
Student > Bachelor 16 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 24 12%
Unknown 25 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 95 47%
Environmental Science 53 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 2%
Unspecified 3 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 1%
Other 9 4%
Unknown 36 18%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2016.
All research outputs
#435,695
of 25,066,230 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#7,796
of 102,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,943
of 269,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#118
of 972 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,066,230 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 102,306 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,712 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 972 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.