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China’s international trade and air pollution in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
75 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
247 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
399 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
China’s international trade and air pollution in the United States
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1312860111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jintai Lin, Da Pan, Steven J. Davis, Qiang Zhang, Kebin He, Can Wang, David G. Streets, Donald J. Wuebbles, Dabo Guan

Abstract

China is the world's largest emitter of anthropogenic air pollutants, and measurable amounts of Chinese pollution are transported via the atmosphere to other countries, including the United States. However, a large fraction of Chinese emissions is due to manufacture of goods for foreign consumption. Here, we analyze the impacts of trade-related Chinese air pollutant emissions on the global atmospheric environment, linking an economic-emission analysis and atmospheric chemical transport modeling. We find that in 2006, 36% of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide, 27% of nitrogen oxides, 22% of carbon monoxide, and 17% of black carbon emitted in China were associated with production of goods for export. For each of these pollutants, about 21% of export-related Chinese emissions were attributed to China-to-US export. Atmospheric modeling shows that transport of the export-related Chinese pollution contributed 3-10% of annual mean surface sulfate concentrations and 0.5-1.5% of ozone over the western United States in 2006. This Chinese pollution also resulted in one extra day or more of noncompliance with the US ozone standard in 2006 over the Los Angeles area and many regions in the eastern United States. On a daily basis, the export-related Chinese pollution contributed, at a maximum, 12-24% of sulfate concentrations over the western United States. As the United States outsourced manufacturing to China, sulfate pollution in 2006 increased in the western United States but decreased in the eastern United States, reflecting the competing effect between enhanced transport of Chinese pollution and reduced US emissions. Our findings are relevant to international efforts to reduce transboundary air pollution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 399 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 381 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 114 29%
Researcher 54 14%
Student > Master 51 13%
Student > Bachelor 38 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 28 7%
Other 73 18%
Unknown 41 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 113 28%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 46 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 31 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 7%
Social Sciences 21 5%
Other 85 21%
Unknown 76 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 704. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2021.
All research outputs
#14,922
of 17,424,044 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#512
of 89,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145
of 262,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#7
of 966 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,424,044 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 89,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 966 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.