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Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
34 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1371 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
469 Mendeley
Title
Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1602480113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tim S. Doherty, Alistair S. Glen, Dale G. Nimmo, Euan G. Ritchie, Chris R. Dickman

Abstract

Invasive species threaten biodiversity globally, and invasive mammalian predators are particularly damaging, having contributed to considerable species decline and extinction. We provide a global metaanalysis of these impacts and reveal their full extent. Invasive predators are implicated in 87 bird, 45 mammal, and 10 reptile species extinctions-58% of these groups' contemporary extinctions worldwide. These figures are likely underestimated because 23 critically endangered species that we assessed are classed as "possibly extinct." Invasive mammalian predators endanger a further 596 species at risk of extinction, with cats, rodents, dogs, and pigs threatening the most species overall. Species most at risk from predators have high evolutionary distinctiveness and inhabit insular environments. Invasive mammalian predators are therefore important drivers of irreversible loss of phylogenetic diversity worldwide. That most impacted species are insular indicates that management of invasive predators on islands should be a global conservation priority. Understanding and mitigating the impact of invasive mammalian predators is essential for reducing the rate of global biodiversity loss.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,371 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 469 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 5 1%
Unknown 444 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 113 24%
Researcher 79 17%
Student > Master 76 16%
Student > Bachelor 69 15%
Unspecified 38 8%
Other 94 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 232 49%
Environmental Science 138 29%
Unspecified 52 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 3%
Social Sciences 6 1%
Other 27 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2019.
All research outputs
#2,780
of 12,821,590 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#109
of 78,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124
of 223,147 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4
of 932 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,821,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78,755 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,147 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 932 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.