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Light-driven carbon dioxide reduction to methane by nitrogenase in a photosynthetic bacterium

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Light-driven carbon dioxide reduction to methane by nitrogenase in a photosynthetic bacterium
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1611043113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn R. Fixen, Yanning Zheng, Derek F. Harris, Sudipta Shaw, Zhi-Yong Yang, Dennis R. Dean, Lance C. Seefeldt, Caroline S. Harwood, Fixen, Kathryn R, Zheng, Yanning, Harris, Derek F, Shaw, Sudipta, Yang, Zhi-Yong, Dean, Dennis R, Seefeldt, Lance C, Harwood, Caroline S, Fixen KR, Zheng Y, Harris DF, Shaw S, Yang ZY, Dean DR, Seefeldt LC, Harwood CS

Abstract

Nitrogenase is an ATP-requiring enzyme capable of carrying out multielectron reductions of inert molecules. A purified remodeled nitrogenase containing two amino acid substitutions near the site of its FeMo cofactor was recently described as having the capacity to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to methane (CH4). Here, we developed the anoxygenic phototroph, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, as a biocatalyst capable of light-driven CO2 reduction to CH4 in vivo using this remodeled nitrogenase. Conversion of CO2 to CH4 by R. palustris required constitutive expression of nitrogenase, which was achieved by using a variant of the transcription factor NifA that is able to activate expression of nitrogenase under all growth conditions. Also, light was required for generation of ATP by cyclic photophosphorylation. CH4 production by R. palustris could be controlled by manipulating the distribution of electrons and energy available to nitrogenase. This work shows the feasibility of using microbes to generate hydrocarbons from CO2 in one enzymatic step using light energy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 56 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
China 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 57 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 42%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Master 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 19%
Chemistry 7 11%
Environmental Science 7 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 8%
Other 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 151. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2016.
All research outputs
#68,026
of 11,337,406 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,777
of 74,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,947
of 260,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#79
of 945 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,337,406 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 945 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.