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Bright illusions reduce the eye's pupil

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2012
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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90 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
237 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Bright illusions reduce the eye's pupil
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1118298109
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Laeng, T. Endestad

Abstract

We recorded by use of an infrared eye-tracker the pupil diameters of participants while they observed visual illusions of lightness or brightness. Four original illusions {based on Gaetano Kanisza's [Kanizsa G (1976) Subjective contours. Sci Am 234:48-52] and Akiyoshi Kitaoka's [Kitaoka A. (2005) Trick Eyes (Barnes & Noble, New Providence, NJ).] examples} were manipulated to obtain control conditions in which the perceived illusory luminance was either eliminated or reduced. All stimuli were equiluminant so that constrictions in pupillary size could not be ascribed to changes in light energy. We found that the pupillary diameter rapidly varied according to perceived brightness and lightness strength. Differences in local contrast information could be ruled out as an explanation because, in a second experiment, the observers maintained eye fixation in the center of the display; thus, differential stimulation of the fovea by local contrast changes could not be responsible for the pupillary differences. Hence, the most parsimonious explanation for the present findings is that pupillary responses to ambient light reflect the perceived brightness or lightness of the scene and not simply the amount of physical light energy entering the eye. Thus, the pupillary physiological response reflects the subjective perception of light and supports the idea that the brain's visual circuitry is shaped by visual experience with images and their possible sources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 737 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 237 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 2%
Netherlands 3 1%
United States 3 1%
Italy 3 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 219 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 24%
Researcher 46 19%
Student > Master 33 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 18 8%
Student > Postgraduate 18 8%
Other 45 19%
Unknown 21 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 92 39%
Neuroscience 28 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 10%
Engineering 19 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 5%
Other 32 14%
Unknown 30 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 488. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2021.
All research outputs
#33,598
of 19,546,162 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#964
of 92,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133
of 233,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#7
of 847 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,546,162 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 92,982 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 847 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.