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Climate mediates hypoxic stress on fish diversity and nursery function at the land–sea interface

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
Title
Climate mediates hypoxic stress on fish diversity and nursery function at the land–sea interface
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1505815112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brent B. Hughes, Matthew D. Levey, Monique C. Fountain, Aaron B. Carlisle, Francisco P. Chavez, Mary G. Gleason

Abstract

Coastal ecosystems provide numerous important ecological services, including maintenance of biodiversity and nursery grounds for many fish species of ecological and economic importance. However, human population growth has led to increased pollution, ocean warming, hypoxia, and habitat alteration that threaten ecosystem services. In this study, we used long-term datasets of fish abundance, water quality, and climatic factors to assess the threat of hypoxia and the regulating effects of climate on fish diversity and nursery conditions in Elkhorn Slough, a highly eutrophic estuary in central California (United States), which also serves as a biodiversity hot spot and critical nursery grounds for offshore fisheries in a broader region. We found that hypoxic conditions had strong negative effects on extent of suitable fish habitat, fish species richness, and abundance of the two most common flatfish species, English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and speckled sanddab (Citharichthys stigmaeus). The estuary serves as an important nursery ground for English sole, making this species vulnerable to anthropogenic threats. We determined that estuarine hypoxia was associated with significant declines in English sole nursery habitat, with cascading effects on recruitment to the offshore adult population and fishery, indicating that human land use activities can indirectly affect offshore fisheries. Estuarine hypoxic conditions varied spatially and temporally and were alleviated by strengthening of El Niño conditions through indirect pathways, a consistent result in most estuaries across the northeast Pacific. These results demonstrate that changes to coastal land use and climate can fundamentally alter the diversity and functioning of coastal nurseries and their adjacent ocean ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Australia 2 2%
Chile 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 103 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 24%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Professor 9 8%
Other 28 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 43%
Environmental Science 31 28%
Unspecified 11 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 8 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2018.
All research outputs
#221,540
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5,116
of 79,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,984
of 233,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#117
of 927 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 927 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.