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Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1423936112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duan Li, Omar S. Mabrouk, Tiecheng Liu, Fangyun Tian, Gang Xu, Santiago Rengifo, Sarah J. Choi, Abhay Mathur, Charles P. Crooks, Robert T. Kennedy, Michael M. Wang, Hamid Ghanbari, Jimo Borjigin

Abstract

The mechanism by which the healthy heart and brain die rapidly in the absence of oxygen is not well understood. We performed continuous electrocardiography and electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental asphyxia and analyzed cortical release of core neurotransmitters, changes in brain and heart electrical activity, and brain-heart connectivity. Asphyxia stimulates a robust and sustained increase of functional and effective cortical connectivity, an immediate increase in cortical release of a large set of neurotransmitters, and a delayed activation of corticocardiac functional and effective connectivity that persists until the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Blocking the brain's autonomic outflow significantly delayed terminal ventricular fibrillation and lengthened the duration of detectable cortical activities despite the continued absence of oxygen. These results demonstrate that asphyxia activates a brainstorm, which accelerates premature death of the heart and the brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Master 7 10%
Professor 6 8%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 22%
Neuroscience 10 14%
Psychology 8 11%
Engineering 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 248. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2021.
All research outputs
#88,289
of 18,917,096 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,052
of 91,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,261
of 236,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#43
of 964 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,917,096 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,963 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 964 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.