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Lesion network localization of criminal behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
46 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
602 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
261 Mendeley
Title
Lesion network localization of criminal behavior
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1706587115
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Ryan Darby, Andreas Horn, Fiery Cushman, Michael D. Fox

Abstract

Following brain lesions, previously normal patients sometimes exhibit criminal behavior. Although rare, these cases can lend unique insight into the neurobiological substrate of criminality. Here we present a systematic mapping of lesions with known temporal association to criminal behavior, identifying 17 lesion cases. The lesion sites were spatially heterogeneous, including the medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and different locations within the bilateral temporal lobes. No single brain region was damaged in all cases. Because lesion-induced symptoms can come from sites connected to the lesion location and not just the lesion location itself, we also identified brain regions functionally connected to each lesion location. This technique, termed lesion network mapping, has recently identified regions involved in symptom generation across a variety of lesion-induced disorders. All lesions were functionally connected to the same network of brain regions. This criminality-associated connectivity pattern was unique compared with lesions causing four other neuropsychiatric syndromes. This network includes regions involved in morality, value-based decision making, and theory of mind, but not regions involved in cognitive control or empathy. Finally, we replicated our results in a separate cohort of 23 cases in which a temporal relationship between brain lesions and criminal behavior was implied but not definitive. Our results suggest that lesions in criminals occur in different brain locations but localize to a unique resting state network, providing insight into the neurobiology of criminal behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 602 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 261 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 261 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 39 15%
Researcher 39 15%
Student > Master 36 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 13%
Student > Postgraduate 15 6%
Other 57 22%
Unknown 41 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 71 27%
Psychology 56 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Engineering 9 3%
Other 23 9%
Unknown 59 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 665. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2020.
All research outputs
#15,876
of 17,135,529 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#541
of 88,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#620
of 415,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#20
of 941 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,135,529 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 415,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 941 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.