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Expansion microscopy of zebrafish for neuroscience and developmental biology studies

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
89 tweeters
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
228 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Expansion microscopy of zebrafish for neuroscience and developmental biology studies
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1706281114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Limor Freifeld, Iris Odstrcil, Dominique Förster, Alyson Ramirez, James A. Gagnon, Owen Randlett, Emma K. Costa, Shoh Asano, Orhan T. Celiker, Ruixuan Gao, Daniel A. Martin-Alarcon, Paul Reginato, Cortni Dick, Linlin Chen, David Schoppik, Florian Engert, Herwig Baier, Edward S. Boyden

Abstract

Expansion microscopy (ExM) allows scalable imaging of preserved 3D biological specimens with nanoscale resolution on fast diffraction-limited microscopes. Here, we explore the utility of ExM in the larval and embryonic zebrafish, an important model organism for the study of neuroscience and development. Regarding neuroscience, we found that ExM enabled the tracing of fine processes of radial glia, which are not resolvable with diffraction-limited microscopy. ExM further resolved putative synaptic connections, as well as molecular differences between densely packed synapses. Finally, ExM could resolve subsynaptic protein organization, such as ring-like structures composed of glycine receptors. Regarding development, we used ExM to characterize the shapes of nuclear invaginations and channels, and to visualize cytoskeletal proteins nearby. We detected nuclear invagination channels at late prophase and telophase, potentially suggesting roles for such channels in cell division. Thus, ExM of the larval and embryonic zebrafish may enable systematic studies of how molecular components are configured in multiple contexts of interest to neuroscience and developmental biology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 228 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 228 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 19%
Researcher 34 15%
Student > Master 32 14%
Student > Bachelor 31 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Other 40 18%
Unknown 33 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 49 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 17%
Engineering 18 8%
Chemistry 13 6%
Other 32 14%
Unknown 40 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 51. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2017.
All research outputs
#423,366
of 15,473,495 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#8,457
of 85,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,523
of 409,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#245
of 951 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,473,495 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85,182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,705 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 951 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.