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Sexual selection on wing interference patterns in Drosophila melanogaster

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Sexual selection on wing interference patterns in Drosophila melanogaster
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1407595111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natsu Katayama, Jessica K. Abbott, Jostein Kjærandsen, Yuma Takahashi, Erik I. Svensson

Abstract

Animals with color vision use color information in intra- and interspecific communication, which in turn may drive the evolution of conspicuous colored body traits via natural and sexual selection. A recent study found that the transparent wings of small flies and wasps in lower-reflectance light environments display vivid and stable structural color patterns, called "wing interference patterns" (WIPs). Such WIPs were hypothesized to function in sexual selection among small insects with wing displays, but this has not been experimentally verified. Here, to our knowledge we present the first experimental evidence that WIPs in males of Drosophila melanogaster are targets of mate choice from females, and that two different color traits--saturation and hue--experience directional and stabilizing sexual selection, respectively. Using isogenic lines from the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, we compare attractiveness of different male WIPs against black and white visual backgrounds. We show that males with more vivid wings are more attractive to females than are males with dull wings. Wings with a large magenta area (i.e., intermediate trait values) were also preferred over those with a large blue or yellow area. These experimental results add a visual element to the Drosophila mating array, integrating sexual selection with elements of genetics and evo-devo, potentially applicable to a wide array of small insects with hyaline wings. Our results further underscore that the mode of sexual selection on such visual signals can differ profoundly between different color components, in this case hue and saturation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
France 2 2%
Canada 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 103 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 24%
Student > Master 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 4%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 13%
Environmental Science 6 5%
Neuroscience 6 5%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 99. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2020.
All research outputs
#194,285
of 14,990,060 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,280
of 84,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,091
of 213,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#111
of 921 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,990,060 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,134 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,766 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 921 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.