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Bird specimens track 135 years of atmospheric black carbon and environmental policy

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
53 news outlets
blogs
17 blogs
twitter
346 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
2 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
113 Mendeley
Title
Bird specimens track 135 years of atmospheric black carbon and environmental policy
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1710239114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shane G. DuBay, Carl C. Fuldner

Abstract

Atmospheric black carbon has long been recognized as a public health and environmental concern. More recently, black carbon has been identified as a major, ongoing contributor to anthropogenic climate change, thus making historical emission inventories of black carbon an essential tool for assessing past climate sensitivity and modeling future climate scenarios. Current estimates of black carbon emissions for the early industrial era have high uncertainty, however, because direct environmental sampling is sparse before the mid-1950s. Using photometric reflectance data of >1,300 bird specimens drawn from natural history collections, we track relative ambient concentrations of atmospheric black carbon between 1880 and 2015 within the US Manufacturing Belt, a region historically reliant on coal and dense with industry. Our data show that black carbon levels within the region peaked during the first decade of the 20th century. Following this peak, black carbon levels were positively correlated with coal consumption through midcentury, after which they decoupled, with black carbon concentrations declining as consumption continued to rise. The precipitous drop in atmospheric black carbon at midcentury reflects policies promoting burning efficiency and fuel transitions rather than regulating emissions alone. Our findings suggest that current emission inventories based on predictive modeling underestimate levels of atmospheric black carbon for the early industrial era, suggesting that the contribution of black carbon to past climate forcing may also be underestimated. These findings build toward a spatially dynamic emission inventory of black carbon based on direct environmental sampling.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 346 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 113 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 22%
Researcher 24 21%
Unspecified 14 12%
Student > Master 13 12%
Other 9 8%
Other 28 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 49%
Unspecified 20 18%
Environmental Science 15 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 6%
Engineering 4 4%
Other 12 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 777. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2019.
All research outputs
#7,132
of 13,848,643 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#276
of 81,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#294
of 275,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#11
of 961 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,848,643 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,916 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 961 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.