↓ Skip to main content

PNAS

Article Metrics

Miller experiments in atomistic computer simulations

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Miller experiments in atomistic computer simulations
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1402894111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonino Marco Saitta, Franz Saija

Abstract

The celebrated Miller experiments reported on the spontaneous formation of amino acids from a mixture of simple molecules reacting under an electric discharge, giving birth to the research field of prebiotic chemistry. However, the chemical reactions involved in those experiments have never been studied at the atomic level. Here we report on, to our knowledge, the first ab initio computer simulations of Miller-like experiments in the condensed phase. Our study, based on the recent method of treatment of aqueous systems under electric fields and on metadynamics analysis of chemical reactions, shows that glycine spontaneously forms from mixtures of simple molecules once an electric field is switched on and identifies formic acid and formamide as key intermediate products of the early steps of the Miller reactions, and the crucible of formation of complex biological molecules.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 134 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 27%
Researcher 40 27%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Student > Master 9 6%
Professor 7 5%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 24 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 48 33%
Physics and Astronomy 30 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 9%
Materials Science 6 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 27 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 128. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2019.
All research outputs
#208,735
of 19,181,681 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,389
of 92,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,317
of 212,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#85
of 914 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,181,681 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 92,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,585 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 914 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.