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The evolution of self-control

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Citations

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212 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
631 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The evolution of self-control
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1323533111
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. L. MacLean, B. Hare, C. L. Nunn, E. Addessi, F. Amici, R. C. Anderson, F. Aureli, J. M. Baker, A. E. Bania, A. M. Barnard, N. J. Boogert, E. M. Brannon, E. E. Bray, J. Bray, L. J. N. Brent, J. M. Burkart, J. Call, J. F. Cantlon, L. G. Cheke, N. S. Clayton, M. M. Delgado, L. J. DiVincenti, K. Fujita, E. Herrmann, C. Hiramatsu, L. F. Jacobs, K. E. Jordan, J. R. Laude, K. L. Leimgruber, E. J. E. Messer, A. C. de A. Moura, L. Ostoji , A. Picard, M. L. Platt, J. M. Plotnik, F. Range, S. M. Reader, R. B. Reddy, A. A. Sandel, L. R. Santos, K. Schumann, A. M. Seed, K. B. Sewall, R. C. Shaw, K. E. Slocombe, Y. Su, A. Takimoto, J. Tan, R. Tao, C. P. van Schaik, Z. Viranyi, E. Visalberghi, J. C. Wade, A. Watanabe, J. Widness, J. K. Young, T. R. Zentall, Y. Zhao

Abstract

Cognition presents evolutionary research with one of its greatest challenges. Cognitive evolution has been explained at the proximate level by shifts in absolute and relative brain volume and at the ultimate level by differences in social and dietary complexity. However, no study has integrated the experimental and phylogenetic approach at the scale required to rigorously test these explanations. Instead, previous research has largely relied on various measures of brain size as proxies for cognitive abilities. We experimentally evaluated these major evolutionary explanations by quantitatively comparing the cognitive performance of 567 individuals representing 36 species on two problem-solving tasks measuring self-control. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that absolute brain volume best predicted performance across species and accounted for considerably more variance than brain volume controlling for body mass. This result corroborates recent advances in evolutionary neurobiology and illustrates the cognitive consequences of cortical reorganization through increases in brain volume. Within primates, dietary breadth but not social group size was a strong predictor of species differences in self-control. Our results implicate robust evolutionary relationships between dietary breadth, absolute brain volume, and self-control. These findings provide a significant first step toward quantifying the primate cognitive phenome and explaining the process of cognitive evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 631 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 16 3%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
France 4 <1%
Austria 3 <1%
Hungary 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
Other 15 2%
Unknown 570 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 152 24%
Researcher 115 18%
Student > Master 94 15%
Student > Bachelor 72 11%
Other 33 5%
Other 165 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 242 38%
Psychology 176 28%
Unspecified 64 10%
Neuroscience 41 6%
Social Sciences 22 3%
Other 86 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 247. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2018.
All research outputs
#42,763
of 12,365,166 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,079
of 77,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#692
of 197,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#36
of 1,069 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,365,166 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,340 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,266 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,069 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.