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Neandertals made the first specialized bone tools in Europe

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
46 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
131 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Neandertals made the first specialized bone tools in Europe
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1302730110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie Soressi, Shannon P. McPherron, Michel Lenoir, Tamara Dogandžić, Paul Goldberg, Zenobia Jacobs, Yolaine Maigrot, Naomi L. Martisius, Christopher E. Miller, William Rendu, Michael Richards, Matthew M. Skinner, Teresa E. Steele, Sahra Talamo, Jean-Pierre Texier

Abstract

Modern humans replaced Neandertals ∼40,000 y ago. Close to the time of replacement, Neandertals show behaviors similar to those of the modern humans arriving into Europe, including the use of specialized bone tools, body ornaments, and small blades. It is highly debated whether these modern behaviors developed before or as a result of contact with modern humans. Here we report the identification of a type of specialized bone tool, lissoir, previously only associated with modern humans. The microwear preserved on one of these lissoir is consistent with the use of lissoir in modern times to obtain supple, lustrous, and more impermeable hides. These tools are from a Neandertal context proceeding the replacement period and are the oldest specialized bone tools in Europe. As such, they are either a demonstration of independent invention by Neandertals or an indication that modern humans started influencing European Neandertals much earlier than previously believed. Because these finds clearly predate the oldest known age for the use of similar objects in Europe by anatomically modern humans, they could also be evidence for cultural diffusion from Neandertals to modern humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 3 2%
United States 3 2%
France 2 2%
Italy 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Portugal 2 2%
Sweden 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 108 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 27%
Researcher 26 20%
Student > Master 20 15%
Professor 12 9%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Other 25 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Arts and Humanities 45 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 26%
Social Sciences 28 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 10%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Other 8 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 501. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,833
of 5,395,646 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#151
of 39,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96
of 97,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#8
of 873 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,395,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 39,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 97,696 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 873 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.