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Surge of neurophysiological coherence and connectivity in the dying brain

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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103 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
455 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Surge of neurophysiological coherence and connectivity in the dying brain
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1308285110
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Borjigin, U. Lee, T. Liu, D. Pal, S. Huff, D. Klarr, J. Sloboda, J. Hernandez, M. M. Wang, G. A. Mashour

Abstract

The brain is assumed to be hypoactive during cardiac arrest. However, the neurophysiological state of the brain immediately following cardiac arrest has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we performed continuous electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental cardiac arrest and analyzed changes in power density, coherence, directed connectivity, and cross-frequency coupling. We identified a transient surge of synchronous gamma oscillations that occurred within the first 30 s after cardiac arrest and preceded isoelectric electroencephalogram. Gamma oscillations during cardiac arrest were global and highly coherent; moreover, this frequency band exhibited a striking increase in anterior-posterior-directed connectivity and tight phase-coupling to both theta and alpha waves. High-frequency neurophysiological activity in the near-death state exceeded levels found during the conscious waking state. These data demonstrate that the mammalian brain can, albeit paradoxically, generate neural correlates of heightened conscious processing at near-death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 232 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 455 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 3%
Japan 5 1%
Germany 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
Netherlands 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Cuba 2 <1%
Other 11 2%
Unknown 407 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 22%
Researcher 80 18%
Student > Master 55 12%
Student > Bachelor 49 11%
Professor 31 7%
Other 99 22%
Unknown 39 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 19%
Psychology 74 16%
Neuroscience 69 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 66 15%
Engineering 36 8%
Other 65 14%
Unknown 60 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 847. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2021.
All research outputs
#12,543
of 18,925,350 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#433
of 91,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59
of 171,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#7
of 907 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,925,350 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,020 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 907 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.